Position Specification for JHLT’s Next President

The Jackson Hole Land Trust Board of Directors and contracted search consultant, Russell Reynolds Associates, are pleased to share the Position Specification for the next president of the Jackson Hole Land Trust. Qualified candidates are invited to apply by contacting JHLT@russellreynolds.com.

Following Laurie Andrew’s announcement that she would be stepping down as president in February 2020, the board of the JHLT established a search committee led by Second Vice Chair of the Board Lori Fields. The search committee has identified the current leadership team—Director of Conservation Liz Long, Chief Financial Officer Derek Schaefer, and Director of Advancement & Engagement Jenny Wolfrom Holladay—to serve as interim co-directors of the organization. The committee selected Jamie Hechinger and her team at Russell Reynolds Associates to assist with the search, working with the JHLT board and staff to select the best candidate possible for the position.

The position specification is the result of a thorough needs assessment conducted by Russell Reynolds Associates with thoughtful input from all members of JHLT staff, board members, and many members of the larger JHLT community, including landowners, donors, and people who JHLT partners with on an ongoing basis.

“We are confident that the position specification we have put forward will be a blueprint for the JHLT’s next president and will attract a deep pool of quality candidates,” said Lori Fields. “We look forward to this next phase of our search, and to ultimately introducing our next leader in the coming months.”

The search committee is committed to advancing the search process, but will continue to monitor the impacts of the current COVID-19 pandemic and prioritize the health and safety of all involved.

Working Lands: Nature Journal Templates + Virtual Events

The Jackson Hole Land Trust is excited to continue rolling out new ways to virtually connect you, our community, to open spaces and conservation. Every other week, we’ll unveil a new theme with opportunities to connect virtually and resources to help kids get to know the natural world.

April Part II (4/13-4/26): Working Lands of Northwest Wyoming

Open Space Adventure: Journey of Food Coloring Book

This week we are exploring how foods grown on farms beyond your backdoor make it to your local market. Download our printable pages in English or Spanish and bring them to life with color and creativity to learn about the journey of food.

Open Space Adventure: Nature Journal

Welcome back to Open Space Adventures! For the next two weeks, we are going to be learning all about working lands like farms and ranches. This week we have two new activities for kids. First, follow along with this video to create a nature journal. Then, have your little ones grab their journals and binoculars from last week to head outside and explore. Go for a walk on the Jackson Hole Community Pathway System’s Grand Loop or out towards Teton Pass and you’ll pass numerous JHLT-conserved working lands* and experience the habitat that sustains the incredible wildlife of Northwest Wyoming. Kids can use the first observation page of the nature journal to draw and write about what they observe. Download the Nature Journal Template in English or Spanish.

*Never trespass on JHLT-protected working lands—they are private properties belonging to their respective landowners.

Open Space Adventure: Start a Garden

Looking for a fun at-home activity? Start your vegetable garden with this helpful video from another local nonprofit, Full Circle Education, at http://www.tetonfullcircle.org/. Hot tip: Kids are great gardeners!

Don’t have any seeds? Watch this video from the Land Trust for Tennessee about how to harvest and plant seeds from food you might already have around the house.

Past Event: 4/16 Virtual Happy Hour
Didn’t make it? Catch the recording here: https://vimeo.com/412910372

JHLT-protected working lands not only preserve wildlife habitat connectivity, but they support our local food system. Join us for another virtual happy hour on Thursday at 4 pm MST with panelists Kate Mead of Mead Ranch, Sonja Rife of Killpecker Creek Cattle Company, Huidekoper Ranch Head Farmer Brent Tyc, and JHLT Stewardship Manager Derek Ellis. Tune in to hear how they’re preparing their working lands for summertime, explore how working lands and wildlife coexist, and have a dialogue about the roles of conservation and ranching in Northwest Wyoming.

Past Event: 4/23 Virtual Trivia: Working Lands
Do you know your local producers? Thank you to those of you who joined us last week at our second virtual happy hour featuring the working lands and ranchers of Northwest Wyoming! This week, put your farming and ranching IQ to the test with trivia. Perfect for both families and quiz-loving adults alike, we invite you to join us this Thursday, April 23 at 4 pm. Grab your favorite beverage and gear up for an exciting hour of brain-teasing questions. Winners will receive a special JHLT prize as well as the opportunity to compete in our trivia championship to come.

Grab your smartphone or computer and connect via the zoom link: https://zoom.us/j/9809695673 or visit zoom.us and click Join A Meeting and enter the meeting code 9809695673.

Photo: Arnie Brokling

Jackson Hole Land Trust’s Response to COVID-19

Dear Community and Supporters,

It is times like these that the power and camaraderie of this community become clear as we band together to prioritize the health and safety of our local, national, and global populations. The Jackson Hole Land Trust (JHLT) is monitoring the status of COVID-19 in Northwest Wyoming and doing our part to prevent the risk of exposure and potential spread of the virus. In order to safeguard the health of our staff, board, partners and community, JHLT has implemented the following policies based on the recommendations made by state and local government and the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC):

  • Mandatory office closure and remote work for all staff, including the Jackson and Green River Valley Program office in Pinedale. All JHLT staff are actively working in a remote setting and can be reached by email, or through voicemails left via JHLT’s messaging system by calling the office at 307-733-4707. This will be in effect through March 31, 2020, and extended if necessary.
  • All internal and external meetings will be conducted through video and teleconferencing technology in order to limit close person-to-person contact within a confined area.
  • Temporary hold on nonessential, work-related travel for employees through April 2020.
  • Cancellation of all community events through April 2020 including:
    • WYLD Beacon Search with Teton County Search and Rescue at R Park on 3/19/2020
    • Eastern Egg Hunt at R Park on 4/10/2020
    • GRVP Happy Hour at Wind River Brewing Company on 4/22/2020
  • Rendezvous “R” Park will remain open to the public at this time, although the office will be closed to staff and visitors and office hours will be cancelled through at least March 31, 2020. We do recommend and request that visitors to R Park implement preventative measures recommended by the CDC, which include social distancing of at least 6 feet from other individuals and families, washing or sanitizing hands before and after visiting the park, and staying home if you or a member of your household are feeling sick.  We are proud to offer a safe, community greenspace that can provide residents with a positive connection to nature and open space- which has been directly linked to enhancing the function of the immune system and increasing mental health- in these times of uncertainty and isolation.

As the situation is changing daily, and sometimes hourly, we will adjust our policies and procedures to reflect recommendations made by local, state, and national entities. Meanwhile, our talented and dedicated team will continue their work towards fulfilling our vision of a legacy of protected open spaces, wildlife habitat, working lands, and community spaces across Northwest Wyoming that inspire current and future generations.

Please use the online staff email directory to contact the appropriate JHLT team member with questions and concerns.

Thank you,
JHLT Interim Co-Directors Liz Long, Derek Schaefer, and Jenny Wolfrom

Laurie Andrews,President of the Jackson Hole Land Trust, Announces Departure

Laurie Andrews will continue career as a community leader as President of the Community Foundation of Jackson Hole

Jackson, WY –It is with gratitude and commendation that the Board of Directors announces today the departure of Laurie Andrews as President of the Jackson Hole Land Trust, effective late February 2020. Andrews will be starting her new position as Executive Director of the Community Foundation of Jackson Hole in March 2020.

Since 2005, Andrews has played a critical role in land conservation for Northwest Wyoming and beyond. During her 15-year tenure at the Jackson Hole Land Trust, Andrews was responsible for the protection of over 8,000 acres of conservation land, led the organization through multiple forward-thinking strategic plans, and expanded the reach of the Jackson Hole Land Trust to encompass the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem.

“Laurie has been an exceptional President and leader for the Jackson Hole Land Trust” said Jason Snider, Board Chair. “We are grateful for Laurie’s visionary direction, which embraced inclusivity, produced strong results, created strong partnerships and prioritized the conservation needs of the whole community.”

“Under Laurie’s leadership, the staff of the Jackson Hole Land Trust more than doubled, the organization successfully completed two significant fundraising campaigns – Forever Our Valley and Save the Block, and we experienced record-breaking annual fundraising and asset growth benchmarks. While we are sad to see her go, we are excited about what her new role means for Jackson’s community and network of non-profits,” continued Snider.

The Board of Directors of the Jackson Hole Land Trust have created a search committee to identify an Interim Director and hire a new permanent leader for the Jackson Hole Land Trust. While the search is underway, the organization is in an excellent position with its accomplished senior leadership team of Jennifer Wolfrom Holladay, Director of Advancement and Engagement, Liz Long, Director of Conservation, and Derek Schaefer, Chief Financial Officer.

“I feel so fortunate to have been a part of such a strong and impactful organization for the past 15 years,” said Andrews. “The Jackson Hole Land Trust has taught me so much about what community means and the passion and generosity that I’ve seen shine through over and over again has been incredibly inspiring. I’m excited to continue my journey as a leader in this special place, and to continue working with extraordinary partners on meaningful projects.”

Continued Andrews, “While it is bittersweet to leave the Jackson Hole Land Trust, I know that the organization is in good hands. The current board and the leadership team are knowledgeable and talented and I will miss working with such a tremendously effective team. While my career is changing directions, my commitment to protecting open spaces is steadfast and I know I will be working with the Jackson Hole Land Trust in some capacity in the future.”

Lori Fields, Vice Chair of the Board of Directors for the Jackson Hole Land Trust, will head the committee that will conduct a wide ranging and broad-based search for a new Executive Director.

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About the Jackson Hole Land Trust

The Jackson Hole Land Trust is a private, non-profit organization that was established in 1980 to protect and steward the treasured landscapes of Northwest Wyoming including Fremont and Sublette counties. With over 55,000 acres protected, our vision is a legacy of protected open spaces, wildlife habitat, working lands and community spaces that inspire current and future generations. For more information, please visit jhlandtrust.org.

605 Acres Protected in Sublette County

The Jackson Hole Land Trust announced today that 605 acres in Sublette County located along the Red Desert to Hoback Mule Deer migration corridor have been protected through the Willow Lake Pasture Conservation Easement now held by the Green River Valley Program of the Jackson Hole Land Trust.

Read the full press release, here.

Green River Valley Program Newsletter online

Our GRVP Newsletter is now available online. Read through program highlights and new projects, as well as announcements and upcoming events for the summer.

2018 Annual Report

Our Annual Report from our 2018 fiscal year is now available online.

Read about our yearly highlights, accomplishments, programming, and much, much more.

Check out the full piece, here.

Genevieve Block Project

For project details, fundraising timeline, and to stay up-to-date on announcements, visit the Genevieve Block Project website.

Read the cover article from the Jackson Hole News & Guide, here.

Learn the call-to-action and project partners in the editorial section’s guest shot from April 17, 2019, here.

Protection Update: Wapiti Junction

The Green River Valley Program of the Jackson Hole Land Trust completed our first conservation easement since the GRVLT/JHLT merger.

The Wapiti Junction Conservation Easement protects two parcels totaling about 40 acres in the Hoback Ranches subdivision, located north of the Hoback Rim about 4 miles from Bondurant. This easement, donated by Bob Hover, provides crucial habitat for moose and elk, as well as seasonal habitat for mule deer.

While the property was tragically completely burned during last year’s Roosevelt Fire, the conservation values of the open space are intact. The fire reclamation process will provide opportunities for the Land Trust to gather valuable data while monitoring and studying the vegetative succession.

We are grateful to Mr. Hover for this generous conservation donation and we look forward to partnering with him on the property’s recovery and redevelopment process.

Landowner Spotlight

Private landowners are critical pieces in Northwest Wyoming’s conservation puzzle. Easement-holding landowners are essential to our work.

We are excited to share their stories with you through this series, highlighting one of our landowner partners each quarter to learn more about what conservation and open spaces mean to them and their families.

This spotlight features the Young Family, owners of the 105-acre Feuz Ranch, protected since 2004, located in Buffalo Valley, Wyoming.

In 1910, Chris Young’s family established a homestead in the area, and in the 1930’s her father purchased the ranch in Buffalo Valley that Chris was raised on and the Young’s now operate. With her grandchildren growing up in the same house that she did, Chris finds great satisfaction teaching another generation how to work the land. The Youngs also have grandkids that live most of the year in Cody, Wyoming, and spend their summers in Buffalo Valley to help with the ranch.

As they graze livestock, cut hay, flood irrigate, fix fence, and control weeds on nearly 1200 acres between their family’s property and the Hatchet Ranch, there is always plenty of work for everyone. Many local producers have moved away from raising cow-calf pairs due to the long hours and nights involved with the spring calving, but the Youngs still persist with this practice, just as they do through these seemingly endless winters. While others lose the horizon in the blowing snow, the Youngs remain steady.

While Chris and Jerome work hard to keep life the way it has been for years, they do notice some changes in Buffalo Valley. The noxious weed situation has become much worse and requires a lot of work to keep in check. She also notes that the past decade has seen increased pressure from wolves during calving season in the spring. In order to reduce predation on the new calves, they have a camper out in the calving pasture and Jerome camps out with the birthing cows to ward off un-welcome wildlife.

To help protect the open lands, rich wildlife habitat, and agricultural heritage of the Feuz Ranch, the Jackson Hole Land Trust purchased a conservation easement from the Youngs in 2004. We would like to extend a hearty thanks to Chris and Jerome and their family for their tireless stewardship of the extraordinary working landscape that is the Buffalo Valley.

See Feuz on our interactive map.