Ben Roth

I’ve always been intrigued by bonsai and their gnarled, twisted character and have wished that there were more around to paint and print. Unfortunately, I don’t think the Land Trust has any holdings in Japan, but while out hiking along the Snake River, I was struck by the abundance of our unaltered version to the stately bonsai – the exquisite sagebrush.

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Jenny Wolfrom recommended the Spring Creek Ranch easement on Spring Gulch Road for sagebrush observation and she was on point. It was fun to go up a new drainage in the valley and I really enjoyed the Dr. Seussian, spindly aspen trees and meandering trails. I was looking a picturesque sage bush with the elegance of bonsai and didn’t find the exact one but several that were close, so I studied them, did some sketches and created the shape I was envisioning.

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I’m in the process of painting the original and then will do a five color screen print next week. My hope is for an edition of 50. I’m painting the bush without background and treating it as a portrait.

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-Ben Roth

Craig Spankie

I decided to check out River Springs, now known as Rendezvous Park (R Park) for my View22 project. I went there with my children a couple of weeks ago. Surprisingly there was a lot of activity at the park as the Jackson Hole Land Trust was hosting their annual FoundSpace art event in conjunction with R Park’s annual Summer Solstice party. We wandered about and the kids made pirate ships with the folks from Jackson Hole Public Art and floated them down  the stream.

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I was interested in the connection between the R Park and Emily’s Pond via the pathway bridge so I made another trip back a few mornings later to explore the area more thoroughly.

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On my second visit I came over the bridge from the Emily’s Pond side into R Park. It was your classically stunning early summer morning in Jackson, with wildly contrasting colors and the Snake River rushing by I felt confident I had gathered enough inspiration to begin my piece for the View22 project…

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– Craig Spankie

Elizabeth Cogburn Birnie

 

My assigned property for this summer’s View22 project is a section of land just south of the Hobacks in Teton Village. I had hiked and skied through this Land Trust property countless time but had no idea it was one of the Land Trust properties until this spring! On my hikes up to Rock Springs, I have enjoyed the beautiful wild flowers, rushing streams and deep forests. I am working on painting one of the views from the property as well as some details of the wild flowers.

– Elizabeth Cogburn Birnie

Kathryn Turner

One of the things I love about time in the natural world is experiencing the intersection of vitality and peace. At a place like the Neilson property, this is possible in an intimate way. The current owners have taken great care to return this 700-acre parcel to its most natural state by removing the roads that were there and restoring this critical elk habitat. As a result, all that I experience on my visit is that which comes from the wind in the trees, the birds darting in and out, and the river current.

It is centering, calming, and at the same time, there is so much going on around me! The natural systems are dynamic and lively and stimulating for me as an artist. I believe it is important to experience the rhythms of nature regularly in order to tap into a deeply creative part of ourselves. At the same time, its balanced harmony is restorative, giving my own inner rhythms a renewed vision borne of serenity.

On this particular visit, I didn’t get to see the elk that were there, but I knew they were there, in the safe cover of the cottonwood forest. I did find so many other inspiring subject matter to paint. I settled on the abstracted calligraphic lines of some lupine growing among grasses. In short order, I was fully present – lost in the dance of light on the surface of the leaves.

–Kathryn Turner

Kay Stratman

I have been honored to join a group of artists asked by the Jackson Hole Land Trust to focus on various properties protected by the Land Trust. The project will culminate in an exhibition and sale at the annual JHLT picnic on August 13th. My assigned space is called the Wilson Wetlands, a small intimate wetland located right in the middle of Wilson, WY.

I never noticed it before when I drove by, but by spending some time there I understand its importance. Besides being a very lovely respite to wander through for humans, it hosts a number of critters and plants that rely on wetlands for survival. Wetlands are so often drained, altered, or covered over to create more land for us humans. Without these wetlands these critters, plants and birds would not be a part of our lives. Though I often paint vast expansive landscapes, my theme for this collection will be something much more close up – wetland birds. I made a recording of bird sounds on one visit so I could not only identify who made the sounds, but also to have something wonderful to listen to while painting.

– Kay Stratman

View22: Field Study!

Jackson Hole Land Trust Announces View22: Field Study

View22 seeks to unite art and conservation to cultivate a deeper sense of place in throughout Western Wyoming. By pairing local artists with iconic and treasured JHLT protected properties – and sharing these experiences with the public through blog posts, artist demonstrations, and a fundraising art show – the View22 project raises awareness for the importance of open space protection for the valley’s wildlife, community, and artists. The project was launched in 2013 together with local artists Kathryn Turner, Jennifer Hoffman, and Bill Sawczuk. In 2014, Kay Northup, Lee Riddell, and Travis Walker joined the project. In 2015, we expanded the project in celebration of the Jackson Hole Land Trust’s 35th anniversary to showcase 35 local artists working in a variety of visual media. The 2016 View22: Open Studio Project included 21 local artists and explored easement-protected open access properties throughout Teton County.

The fifth year of the View22 Project once again unites art and conservation with local artists creating place-based art on Jackson Hole Land Trust (JHLT) protected properties to raise awareness of the importance of open space protection in Jackson Hole. We are excited to announce that this year’s project is expanded to include artists and properties from our Green River Valley Program and Wind River Program areas. The concept for 2017 – View22: Field Study – is to give artists the opportunity to visit the same site on a number of occasions. This year’s artists are busy creating three to four pieces of art for the View22: Field Study Exhibit at the Annual Picnic on August 13th. The goal of View22: Field Study is to allow artists to form a deeper connection to the conservation land they are visiting and working on and to portray through their art the changes and cycles that take place on the landscape throughout the summer.

With the addition of artists and properties in our project areas we hope to continue the synthesis of art and land conservation throughout Western Wyoming. Bobbi Miller – a new artist painting in our Wind River Program area says, “I am thrilled to be participating in the View 22 Field Study Invitational and have fallen in love with a magnificent property in Dubois! The Three Spear Ranch exudes multifaceted natural beauty which lends itself to many artistic interpretations. I hope that mine will elicit feelings which will move others to thoughtfully engage in the Land Trust’s mission statement of preserving open spaces, scenic vistas and historic heritage.”

This year’s View22 artists represent a wonderfully diverse range of local fine art galleries, studios, and independent artists from Teton, Sublette, and Freemont Counties: Diane Benefiel, Emily Boespflug, Richard Burke, Lee Carlman Riddell, Elizabeth Cogburn Birnie, Katy Ann Fox, Nicole Gaitan, Alyssa Hartmann, Dwayne Harty, Gary Keimig, Laurie LaMere, Charmian McLellan, Kay Meeks, Bobbi, Miller, Bronwyn Minton, Erin O’Connor, Abby Paffrath, Jocelyn Slack, Kay Stratman, Carrie Wild, and Kathy Wipfler.

View22: Open Studio!

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Jackson Hole Land Trust Announces View22: Open Studio

The Jackson Hole Land Trust is excited to announce the fourth year of the View22 Project which once again unites art and conservation with local artists creating place-based art on JHLT protected properties to raise awareness of the importance of open space protection. The concept for 2016 – View22: Open Studio – is an exploration of Jackson Hole Land Trust properties that are open to the public and/or access friendly for artists as well as others to enjoy and experience. 20 local artists will be creating one or two pieces from these designated locations, accessing the Open Studio locations when the timing for conditions and schedule work for them. The artists will share their experiences painting on conservation land through stories and photos on our interactive View22 blog and the project will culminate with a final exhibit and art sale at the Land Trust’s 36th Annual Picnic on August 14th. Similar to 2015, View22: Open Studio locations will be marked with green flags in early August.

View22 seeks to unite art and conservation to cultivate a deeper sense of place in Jackson Hole. By pairing local artists with iconic and treasured Jackson Hole Land Trust protected properties – and sharing these experiences with the public through blog posts, artist demonstrations, and a fundraising art show – the View22 project raises awareness for the importance of open space protection for the valley’s wildlife, community, and artists. The View22 project was launched in 2013 together with local artists Kathryn Turner, Jennifer Hoffman, and Bill Sawczuk of Trio Fine Art Gallery. An organic partnership, it was proposed to the Land Trust by the Trio artists out of recognition for the invaluable role that open spaces play in their livelihoods as artists and to portray the beautiful, dynamic protected spaces in our valley through their paintbrushes.

Longtime Land Trust supporter and veteran View22 artist Lee Riddell said, “I love being a part of the View22 project – where the creation of art is both inspired by and contributes to the protection of wildlife habitat and open space for all to enjoy. As a landscape painter being out on these properties emphasizes for me the importance of preserving these land forever.”

This year’s View22 artists represent a wonderfully diverse range of local fine art galleries, studios, and independent artists: Joe Arnold, Diane Benefiel, Emily Boespflug, Elizabeth Cogburn, Scotty Craighead, Katy Ann Fox, Pamela Gibson, Eliot Goss, Dwayne Harty, Todd Kosharek, Bronwyn Minton, Erin O’Connor, Abby Paffrath, Mike Piggott, Lee Carlman Riddell, Ben Roth, Bill Sawczuk, Craig Spankie, Travis Walker, Carrie Wild, and Kathy Wipfler.

View22 at the Top of the Tram – July 9, 2015

On the morning of July 9th, the Jackson Hole Land Trust held a View22 artist demonstration session at the top of the Tram at the Jackson Hole Mountain Resort. Dwayne Harty, Abby Paffrath, Ben Roth, and Carrie Wild were the View22 artist representatives for this year’s collaboration with JHMR.

Upon waking, we were dismayed to see that the weather was cloudy and grey and showed no signs of lifting anytime soon. Still, we decided we should go up to the top and see what the day would bring. Thanks to JHMR, we caught an early Tram up the mountain and everyone enjoyed Corbet’s Cabin waffles and coffee while we waited for the clouds to clear.

After an hour or so of waiting, our intrepid View22 artists decided to head out and see what they could find for painting inspiration. It’s always interesting seeing the different ways that people approach any task they have to do. For example, our four artists couldn’t have chosen more different paths to create art in these unique and challenging conditions.

Dwayne caught a glimpse of Cody peak, the mountains to the west of Rendezvous Mountain, and the Granite Creek drainage before the clouds swallowed the views and he was left to paint from memory with fleeting hints at the landscape as the clouds breathed in and out at the top of the mountain.

Carrie Wild took a slightly more abstract view of her surroundings, and after joking that her signed white canvas was an accurate rendition of the mist-enshrouded landscape, she got down to business using a palate of blues and purples. Carrie paints with acrylics, as opposed to oil or watercolor, and the humid, dewy nature of the clouds made for some interesting blending and dripping effects.

Ben Roth decided to work with oil pastels and charcoal on a smaller scale and did several close-up and intimate studies of the flowers and trees at the top of the Tram. He also tried to capture the clouds, although he says that they are one of the most difficult things to accurately portray as an artist.

Abby’s take was entirely different, as she decided to see what the lower elevations had to offer back down at the base of the Tram – and we can’t wait to see what she found for inspiration!
The many visitors that took the Tram up to the top on this morning enjoyed chatting with the artists and seeing them at work, with their canvases being some of the most colorful scenery to be seen in the foggy white-out.

Even though the weather was not particularly cooperative, the View22 event was a success! We at the Land Trust are grateful to Anna Cole, Margaret Brady, and the Jackson Hole Mountain Resort for hosting the event. We’re also incredibly grateful to the four artists for donating their time and sticking it out despite the conditions. Lastly, we wish to thank the handful of Land Trust supporters and Open Space Council members that came up to the “top of the world” for a visit on this stormy July day.

-Roxy Pierson

View22: Field Study Works Now Available Online!

In 2017, we invited 21 local artists to create place-inspired art on 18 Jackson Hole Land Trust conservation properties in Teton, Fremont, and Sublette counties. The momentum for the project built over the summer as artists created their works and interacted with the community at artist demonstrations at the R Lazy S, and the Teton Food Tour.

View22: Field Study will culminate this Sunday, August 13th, 2017 with an exhibit and sale at the Jackson Hole Land Trust’s 37th Annual Picnic at the Hardeman North Meadow in Wilson.

The 80 finished works are now available for viewing and purchase through our downloadable e-catalog! The catalog will be updated periodically to reflect sales.

For inquiries regarding art sales please contact Roxanne Pierson at roxanne@jhlandtrust.org or 307-733-4707.

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This painting session is scheduled for September12th, 2013! Sign up to receive email updates from us to the right so you get our blog posts right in your inbox!