Construction Update: New shrubs & Kiosk advancement

Another week of summer has passed and Rendezvous Park (R Park) continues to see positive changes as construction progresses. All park improvements are made possible by the the $1.7 million grant awarded to Jackson Hole Land Trust (JHLT)  by the LOR Foundation to complete the community’s vision of the park. We will continue to keep R Park visitors and enthusiasts informed through this weekly Transformation Tuesday blog post. If you’d like to receive this update directly to your email inbox, click here. 

Whats happening this week?

Have you noticed more foliage in sections of R Park? Part of R Park’s transformation includes 169 shrubs we just planted throughout the property. This includes dogwoods, hawthorns, willows, and serviceberries.

 

What is the significance of these shrubs? Dogwoods typically grow well in almost any fertile, well-drained soil and are common in reclamation of landscape. Serviceberry shrubs can grow as tall as 30 feet and can be pruned to have one truck (as in the form of a tree) or can be left as a multi stemmed shrub. The white blossoms are especially large on this hybrid, so be on the lookout as these young shrubs begin to flower in their new habitat. Willow’s and Hawthorn’s typically inhabit areas that provide moisture, such as R Park’s wetlands and lowland area’s. Hawthorn shrubs are a member of the rose family, and typically feature a knotty, twisted trunk grey to reddish brown bark. Come visit R Park to walk the new trails and enjoy the new native plant life!

What’s happening with the Welcome Kiosk?

As of this week, concrete has been poured to help set the foundation for R Park’s soon to be Welcome Kiosk. The pouring of concrete is an essential part of the construction process for setting where the structure will be build.

Trail closures

Due to the construction of the Welcome Kiosk, the northern connector pathway off of the R Park roundabout is not accessible. Please use caution when navigating this area, and use alternative pathways to navigate around the construction. 

For updates or questions

As we embark on these next two years, we aim to provide and educate the public about the on-going construction process. We take great pride in providing accessible open spaces for the public to enjoy, and we want everyone to feel comfortable getting out on the land while these changes develop.  Every week to keep R Park visitors and enthusiasts informed we will post a Transformation Tuesday blog post. If you’d like to receive this update directly to your email inbox, click here. 

Receive construction information and related park impacts by connecting with us via Email, Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram.

Be “R” Ambassador 

As we move forward with construction and reclamation of the property, we are always in need of helpful volunteers to guide visitors and act as ambassadors for the patrons of R Park. If you’re interested in volunteering please click here

 

Construction Update: Progress at R Park

Have you been wondering what’s going on at R Park? Tractors, gravel, orange tape? This past May of 2017, the Jackson Hole Land Trust (JHLT) was awarded a $1.7 million grant from the LOR Foundation to complete the community’s vision of the park. Thanks to this generous grant, construction has begun on the park’s final stages of transformation, which will provide a welcome pavilion, connected pathways and bridges, permanent restroom facilities, trail signage, a picnic shelter and additional landscaping and reclamation. With this grant money JHLT and LOR have committed to providing visitors with a better park experience while keeping the park open and accessible to the public during all three phases of construction. Construction is expected to be complete by July 2019.

As we embark on these next two years, we aim to provide and educate the public about the on-going construction process. We take great pride in providing accessible open spaces for the public to enjoy, and we want everyone to feel comfortable getting out on the land while these changes develop.  Every week to keep R Park visitors and enthusiasts informed we will post a Transformation Tuesday blog post. If you’d like to receive this update directly to your email inbox, click here.

What’s happening this week: 

Keep an eye on the beginning stages of our Welcome Kiosk. Although it may only look like a couple of holes in the ground, it is the beginning of functional restrooms and a shaded area for visitors to enjoy. All pathways are to remain open surrounding the construction site.

What is the welcome kiosk? 

R Park is a product of community feedback and we value our close relationship with our users. “When we first got the park we did three different open houses, and then we did an online survey where we received over 500 responses,” said Jackson Hole Land Trust President Laurie Andrews. What we found through tremendous community outreach is that our users value the park as an overall family friendly area. With a comprehensive map of R Park and initial information about the park, this Welcome Kiosk will help guide families and visitors as they utilize the space. Below are two renderings of what the kiosk will look like once complete:           

For updates or questions

Receive construction information and related park impacts by connecting with us via Email, Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram.

Be “R” Ambassador 

As we move forward with construction and reclamation of the property, we are always in need of helpful volunteers to guide visitors and act as ambassadors for the patrons of R Park. If you’re interested in volunteering please click here

 

 

Jackson Hole Land Trust Invites Community to 37th Annual Picnic

The Jackson Hole Land Trust invites the community to attend the 37th Annual Land Trust Picnic at the Hardeman North property on Sunday, August 13, 2017. This beloved community tradition will feature the View22: Field Study Exhibit, music by PTO, a demonstration by the Teton Raptor Center, local beef from the Lockhart Cattle Company, cocktails by Jackson Hole Still Works, children’s activities, an opportunity to visit existing FoundSpace art installations, and a speaking program highlighting the Sense of Place that open spaces bring to Jackson.

Read the full press release, here.

Jackson Hole Land Trust Announces Overhead Utility Line Burial Initiative

The Jackson Hole Land Trust (JHLT) announced today an exciting new partnership with Lower Valley Energy (LVE), the local cooperative and utility provider for Teton County. JHLT will be working closely with LVE on this new initiative created to assist with the burial of overhead utility lines on existing conservation easement properties along scenic highway corridors in JHLT’s service area. The initiative will launch with the pilot project at Snake River Ranch which will extend LVE’s existing plans to bury utility lines from the Jackson Hole Mountain Resort to the Snake River Ranch by up to an additional 2,700 feet.

Read the entire press release, here.

Celebrate Open Spaces and Art at FoundSpace

The Jackson Hole Land Trust in partnership with Jackson Hole Public Art invites the community to join five local artists for the third year of FoundSpace to explore open space and interact with art installations at JHLT easementprotected properties Wilson Centennial Ponds and Hardeman North Meadow. To celebrate the crossroads of art and conservation, FoundSpace brings together open spaces and public art in an accessible, family-friendly venue.

The 2017 FoundSpace celebration will take place on Friday, June 9. The community is invited between 5 PM and 8 PM to join the celebration, engage with the five local FoundSpace artists, and watch the full moon rise along the community bike path at Hardeman North Meadow, between Stilson Lot and the Wilson School. The unveiling of the art installations will feature local food from the Café Genevieve truck for $2, free refreshments from Melvin Brewing, and live music from One Ton Pig. The first 200 event attendees to visit all four of the art installations will also receive a custom, limited-edition FoundSpace hat featuring artwork by Abby Paffrath. The FoundSpace installations will remain in place until the day after the Jackson Hole Land Trust Annual Picnic on August 13.

Read the full press release, here.

JH Land Trust to Complete Rendezvous Park for Community

We are thrilled to announce that The LOR Foundation has awarded a grant of $1.7 million to The Jackson Hole Land Trust (JHLT) to realize the vision established for Rendezvous Park by and for the community!

The LOR Foundation and JHLT partnered in 2011 to purchase our 41-acre property which is located to the north and west of the Highway 22 Bridge over the Snake River and includes the Wilson boat launch, a popular community access point for boating, angling, swimming, and pedestrian paths along the levee. Over the past five years, R Park has been reclaimed from a private commercial gravel pit into a public-access natural park visited by over 5,000 people a year.

The grant money will allow JHLT to complete the final stages of R Park’s transformation as originally envisioned by the community. New amenities will provide visitors with a better park experience including a welcome pavilion, connected pathways and bridges, permanent restroom facilities, trail signage, a picnic shelter, bike racks, benches and additional landscaping and reclamation. 
Construction will be completed in three phases over the next 24 months and we will remain open to the public.
Click here to read the full press release.

JH Land Trust to Complete Rendezvous Park for Community

The Jackson Hole Land Trust (JHLT) is pleased to announce that it has been awarded a $1.7 million grant from the LOR Foundation to realize the vision established for Rendezvous Park (R Park) by and for the community. The LOR Foundation and JHLT partnered in 2011 to purchase the 41-acre property which is located to the north and west of the Highway 22 Bridge over the Snake River and includes the Wilson boat launch, a popular community access point for boating, angling, swimming, and pedestrian paths along the levee.

Over the past five years, R Park has been reclaimed from a private commercial gravel pit into a public-access natural park visited by over 5,000 people a year. The new grant from the LOR Foundation will allow JHLT to complete the park’s transformation, providing visitors with a better park experience including a welcome pavilion, connected pathways and bridges, permanent restroom facilities, trail signage, a picnic shelter, bike racks, benches and additional landscaping and reclamation.

Read the full press release here.

Employment Opportunity: Community Conservation Manager/R Park Director

The Jackson Hole Land Trust is seeking to fill the position of Community Conservation Manager/R Park Director. Please see the job description for details. To apply, email a cover letter and resume to [email protected]. No phone calls, please.

April E-Newsletter Available Online!

Our April e-newsletter is now available online! Save the dates for our exciting upcoming summer events – from FoundSpace, to Doggie Hamlet, to the Annual Picnic; learn about the recent transfer of the Hardeman Barns from the Land Trust to the Teton Raptor Center; catch up on our Annual Report; read about one of our new Open Space Council Members, Eric Seymour; and connect with us on Facebook and Instagram.

Hardeman Barns Transferred to Teton Raptor Center

The Jackson Hole Land Trust and Teton Raptor Center announced today that the 27-acre iconic conservation property of Hardeman Barns in Wilson, Wyoming, has transferred to the Teton Raptor Center. In 1989, a groundswell of community support generated $1.7 million in 4 months to enable the JHLT to purchase the property, safeguarding it from a dense 70-unit subdivision. The community’s ultimate vision was to utilize the iconic space as a hub for nonprofit organizations that give back to the local community through education and research. The Teton Raptor Center fulfills that vision completely.

Read the full press release to learn about the transfer and the partnership between the JHLT and the Teton Raptor Center.