Construction Update: New Pathways

Things are really shaping up at Rendezvous Park and we are excited to show you the progress. All park improvements are made possible by the  $1.7 million grant awarded to Jackson Hole Land Trust (JHLT)  by the LOR Foundation to complete the community’s vision of the park.

What’s happening this week?

 

First up, take a peek at these updated pathways which will soon feature accessible bridges currently being constructed along the south end of R Park’s property. The soon-to-be completed bridges run parallel to the bike pathway and will provide relief from these typically flooded trail areas.

Along these newly installed bridges you will be able to explore parts of the park that were relatively inaccessible beforehand. Whereas previously during rain and high water these trails were impassable, now visitors can meander around this secluded area and not have to wade through shallow streams.

For updates or questions

As we embark on these next two years, we aim to provide and educate the public about the on-going construction process. Every week to keep R Park visitors and enthusiasts informed we will post a Transformation blog post. If you’d like to receive this update directly to your email inbox, click here.

Receive construction information and related park impacts by connecting with us via Email, Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram.

Be “R” Ambassador 

As we move forward with construction and reclamation of the property, we are always in need of helpful volunteers to guide visitors and act as ambassadors for the patrons of R Park. If you’re interested in volunteering please click here

Help us build for our future- Donate to R Park

While the transformation of Rendezvous Park is ongoing, our progress towards reaching the community vision for the park is clear and measurable. With an impressive 8,000 human visitors in 2016, we’ve also learned that wildlife loves R Park’s reclaimed habitat as elk herds pass through in the colder months and moose happily munch on Cottonwoods and cool off in the ponds during the summer.

 

R Park is a public park that is privately managed and funded. We rely on gifts from supporters like you to help keep the day-to-day operations of the park running smoothly. Please consider donating to R Parkevery gift, large or small, matters.

 

Notes from the Field: Connectivity of the Snake River Watershed

Cool mornings and the sun falling over the western mountains earlier and earlier each night reminds us that the fleeting summer is nearing its end. As the eclipse mania fades in Jackson and the surrounding areas, we can’t help but reminisce about the gorgeous summer days spent on the protected properties throughout the valley. Every single one of our conservation easements has one thing in common: water. Whether situated along the Snake River Riparian Corridor or with views of the Skillet Glacier on Moran, all of the properties we work to conserve rely on water to nourish the dynamic natural communities.

The Snake River and its tributaries trace like arteries throughout our valley. It pumps south, all while being refreshed by the bubbling veins of the Buffalo Fork, the Gros Ventre, Fish Creek and countless other hydrologic capillaries. Just like the heart, our river systems are the lifeblood of our land, providing moisture, habitat, recreation, views and a unique connectivity throughout the landscape. Mountain streams carrying snow melt from deep in the Tetons converge with the Snake that has just passed through open fields of sage and wildflowers, dense forests and ranch lands dotted with cattle and bison alike. No other system in the valley is as dynamic and far reaching as our watershed.

This past winter saw record snowfall amounts that directly impacted the nature of our hydrologic systems by the time spring had arrived. While adventurous rafters and kayakers exulted as the dark, silt-laden waters reached over 30,000 cfs in the canyon, landowners along the Snake River riparian corridor braced for flooding and watched as the high water mark creeped past the willows and into the cottonwood stands. Even behind the levee, back channels and irrigation ditches topped their banks as the system was saturated. Some ranchers rejoiced as they were able to move water to the far reaches of their properties that have been left desiccated and moisture-strapped for many seasons. At the same time, riparian willow and cottonwood communities quietly enjoyed the rising water table and fresh silt deposits. Cottonwood regeneration relies heavily on the introduction of rich, flood-deposits and waits until water rise to release its soft, fluffy seeds which then get trapped by sticky, fresh silt.  High-water seasons like this past spring serve can serve as catalysts for revitalization in riparian zones.

The habitat and resources that the river system provides pump life and productivity into the valley. Ranchers rely on wet meadows for hay production and healthy forage while migrating neotropical songbirds find food sources and excellent cover in the twisted branches of willows and wildflowers. Fishing raptors like osprey and bald eagles patrol the currents for signs of silvery trout while rafters and fishermen find adventure and share these experiences with visitors from all over the world. And while the river continues to beat forward, carving new channels and islands, pushing into new back channels and scouring new pools, it is always providing connectivity. From the ranchers to the rafters, the alpine high-country to the meadows, the songbirds to the soaring eagles, the watershed of the Snake River is the most dynamic force in connecting this community.

-Molly Broom, Stewardship Associate

Photo: Dynamic waterways flowing toward Munger Mountain 

Construction Update: New shrubs & Kiosk advancement

Another week of summer has passed and Rendezvous Park (R Park) continues to see positive changes as construction progresses. All park improvements are made possible by the the $1.7 million grant awarded to Jackson Hole Land Trust (JHLT)  by the LOR Foundation to complete the community’s vision of the park. We will continue to keep R Park visitors and enthusiasts informed through this weekly Transformation Tuesday blog post. If you’d like to receive this update directly to your email inbox, click here. 

Whats happening this week?

Have you noticed more foliage in sections of R Park? Part of R Park’s transformation includes 169 shrubs we just planted throughout the property. This includes dogwoods, hawthorns, willows, and serviceberries.

 

What is the significance of these shrubs? Dogwoods typically grow well in almost any fertile, well-drained soil and are common in reclamation of landscape. Serviceberry shrubs can grow as tall as 30 feet and can be pruned to have one truck (as in the form of a tree) or can be left as a multi stemmed shrub. The white blossoms are especially large on this hybrid, so be on the lookout as these young shrubs begin to flower in their new habitat. Willow’s and Hawthorn’s typically inhabit areas that provide moisture, such as R Park’s wetlands and lowland area’s. Hawthorn shrubs are a member of the rose family, and typically feature a knotty, twisted trunk grey to reddish brown bark. Come visit R Park to walk the new trails and enjoy the new native plant life!

What’s happening with the Welcome Kiosk?

As of this week, concrete has been poured to help set the foundation for R Park’s soon to be Welcome Kiosk. The pouring of concrete is an essential part of the construction process for setting where the structure will be build.

Trail closures

Due to the construction of the Welcome Kiosk, the northern connector pathway off of the R Park roundabout is not accessible. Please use caution when navigating this area, and use alternative pathways to navigate around the construction. 

For updates or questions

As we embark on these next two years, we aim to provide and educate the public about the on-going construction process. We take great pride in providing accessible open spaces for the public to enjoy, and we want everyone to feel comfortable getting out on the land while these changes develop.  Every week to keep R Park visitors and enthusiasts informed we will post a Transformation Tuesday blog post. If you’d like to receive this update directly to your email inbox, click here. 

Receive construction information and related park impacts by connecting with us via Email, Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram.

Be “R” Ambassador 

As we move forward with construction and reclamation of the property, we are always in need of helpful volunteers to guide visitors and act as ambassadors for the patrons of R Park. If you’re interested in volunteering please click here

 

Jackson Hole Land Trust Invites Community to 37th Annual Picnic

The Jackson Hole Land Trust invites the community to attend the 37th Annual Land Trust Picnic at the Hardeman North property on Sunday, August 13, 2017. This beloved community tradition will feature the View22: Field Study Exhibit, music by PTO, a demonstration by the Teton Raptor Center, local beef from the Lockhart Cattle Company, cocktails by Jackson Hole Still Works, children’s activities, an opportunity to visit existing FoundSpace art installations, and a speaking program highlighting the Sense of Place that open spaces bring to Jackson.

Read the full press release, here.

Construction Update: Progress at R Park

Have you been wondering what’s going on at R Park? Tractors, gravel, orange tape? This past May of 2017, the Jackson Hole Land Trust (JHLT) was awarded a $1.7 million grant from the LOR Foundation to complete the community’s vision of the park. Thanks to this generous grant, construction has begun on the park’s final stages of transformation, which will provide a welcome pavilion, connected pathways and bridges, permanent restroom facilities, trail signage, a picnic shelter and additional landscaping and reclamation. With this grant money JHLT and LOR have committed to providing visitors with a better park experience while keeping the park open and accessible to the public during all three phases of construction. Construction is expected to be complete by July 2019.

As we embark on these next two years, we aim to provide and educate the public about the on-going construction process. We take great pride in providing accessible open spaces for the public to enjoy, and we want everyone to feel comfortable getting out on the land while these changes develop.  Every week to keep R Park visitors and enthusiasts informed we will post a Transformation Tuesday blog post. If you’d like to receive this update directly to your email inbox, click here.

What’s happening this week: 

Keep an eye on the beginning stages of our Welcome Kiosk. Although it may only look like a couple of holes in the ground, it is the beginning of functional restrooms and a shaded area for visitors to enjoy. All pathways are to remain open surrounding the construction site.

What is the welcome kiosk? 

R Park is a product of community feedback and we value our close relationship with our users. “When we first got the park we did three different open houses, and then we did an online survey where we received over 500 responses,” said Jackson Hole Land Trust President Laurie Andrews. What we found through tremendous community outreach is that our users value the park as an overall family friendly area. With a comprehensive map of R Park and initial information about the park, this Welcome Kiosk will help guide families and visitors as they utilize the space. Below are two renderings of what the kiosk will look like once complete:           

For updates or questions

Receive construction information and related park impacts by connecting with us via Email, Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram.

Be “R” Ambassador 

As we move forward with construction and reclamation of the property, we are always in need of helpful volunteers to guide visitors and act as ambassadors for the patrons of R Park. If you’re interested in volunteering please click here